Cloud
LuxOUG – 2022
Category: Cloud,Database Author: Andre Luiz Dutra Ontalba (Board Member) Date: 2 years ago Comments: 0

LuxOUG - EMEA Community Tour 2022

 
 
As part of EMEA Community Tour 2022 , we invite everyone to attend our first face-to-face event in Luxembourg.

 

 

 

We will hold our first event in Luxembourg, covering various technologies such as DevOps, Engineered System, Middleware, Cloud and others.
Location: Luxembourg
Date: 05/10/2022
Event Schedule: 9:00 AM – 18:00 PM (CEST)
Atrium Business Park
Address:  25 Rue du puits Romain, 8070 Bertrange.
 
How to reach the event and some additional information about using public transportation here in Luxembourg.  Click here
 

 Register for the event :  Click here

Event Schedule



Presentation slides



Event Photos




Sponsor


Oracle Groundbreakers EMEA – Virtual Tour 2021 (LuxOUG)
Category: Cloud Author: Andre Luiz Dutra Ontalba (Board Member) Date: 3 years ago Comments: 0

Oracle Groundbreakers EMEA - Virtual Tour 2021 (LuxOUG)

 
 
Are you ready to virtually hit the road again this fall ? You should be!
#OGBEMEA Virtual Tour 2021 will take place between 15th of October and 29th of October.
 
This year, 10 Oracle User groups are collaborating to bring together novices and specialists from all over the world.
 
During 11 days more than 70 speakers will present from the #OGBEMEA virtual stage.
 
 
Registration is open!
 
Save this date of October 19, LuxOUG will be part of this great event. See the agenda and register for all events you wish to participate !!!

 

Link to event registration: http://ogbemea.com/agenda-2021/3/#luxoug

 

See you at the event !!

Creating a simple sftp in OL8 using the free resources of OCI.
Category: Cloud Author: César Carvalho Date: 3 years ago Comments: 0

Creating a simple sftp in OL8 using the free resources of OCI.

  1. 1. Provisioning Compute service.
For those who are not used to OCI, here is a description of what Compute Instances is.
The Compute service helps you provision VMs and bare metal instances to meet your compute and application requirements. An instance is a compute host. Choose between virtual machines (VMs) and bare metal instances. The image that you use to launch an instance determines its operating system and other software.
All the resources used are free, a VM with 1 OCP and 1GB of ram memory, with two 50GB block volume.
1.1 Enter the name of your instance and change the version of Oracle linux that we will use to OL8.
1.2 For those who are used to working and studying using OCI, we know that linux environments are accessed using a private key and not by user and password. In this way, download the private key and publish what the OCI will generate so that you can have access to the OL8 environment, then go to the create option.
1.3 Wait until the instance is provisioned and created.
1.4 Instance created and available for use, on the right side we have the public access ip and the user that we will use together with the private key.
2. We will add two 50gb block storage that OCI makes available for free, we will provision these two disks and we will use LVM to compose 100gb dedicated for our sftp files. Block volumes provide high-performance network storage to support a broad range of I/O intensive workloads.
2.1 Creating two free 50gb block volumes.
2.2 We will name it vol1, we will use Block Volume in the same Availability Domain as our instance with Oracle Linux 8, then we will go to the custom option to use the maximum performance of the volume allowed with the higther performance option.
2.3 Waiting for the provisioning and creation of the Block volume.
3. Adding the block volumes vol1 and vol2 in the instance Oracle Linux 8 sftp. Click on vol1, then attached instances.
3.1 We will add the vol1 and vol2 in instance, then we will choose the type of access and device path.
3.2 Provisioning and Attaching block volumes vol1 and vol2
4. Accessing the OL8 laboratory1 instance with a private key, in this example I am using the Mobaxterm tool.
4.1 Adding block volumes vol1 and vol2 on Oracle Linux 8 iSCSI.
Run the commands copied from the iSCSI Commands tab.
5 Adding block volumes vol1 and vol2 on Oracle Linux 8 with LVM.
5.1 Creating Physical Volumes
5.2 List physical volumes created PVS.
5.3 Create volume group with size of 100gb, adding the two block volumes vol1 and vol2.
5.4 Create logical volume with 100gb for use.
5.5 Formatting volume created from LVM volsftp in xfs.
5.6 Configuring fstab to automatically mount the volume created in the LVM.
5.7 Mounting the LVM volume.
6. Installing the SFTP service on Oracle Linux 8.
6.1 Configuring SFTP.
6.2 Creating the cesar user that we will use to access sftp.
6.3 Adding the user cesar to have access to sftp.
6.4 As at OCI we access linux environments with a private key, we will have to adjust it so that the user can access by password and not by private key.
6.5 Enabling and starting the sftp service.
6.6 For security change the user password opc.
6.7 Testing access using wiscp with sftp on the public ip of the instance.
 
César Carvalho – DBA
Contact: https://twitter.com/Cesar_DBA
https://sgbdbrasil.wordpress.com/

Mounting an Oracle Cloud Object Storage Bucket as a File System on Linux
Category: Cloud Author: Andre Luiz Dutra Ontalba (Board Member) Date: 3 years ago Comments: 0

Mounting an Oracle Cloud Object Storage Bucket as a File System on Linux

Today I bring a very cool article of a need that arose to present an Object Storage on Linux to perform a backup.
You can use it to backup your database, upload files, and more
 
Prerequisites:
Ensure that bucket you’re trying to mount is in the compartment listed for S3 compatibility; by default, it’s a root compartment of the tenancy.
If you need to change that, settings are located under Administration->Tenancy Details->Edit Object Storage Setting.

 

Create an Object Storage Bucket from the OCI Console.

Click in Object Storage
Enter a name for the bucket and click on Create Bucket.
Install s3fs-fuse
You can install s3fs-fuse by using a prebuilt package from the Oracle Linux EPEL repository. In this post, I’m using the binary RPM.
Configure Credentials
 
In the Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Console, click the Profile icon in the top-right corner, and select User Settings.
 
Click Customer Secret Keys, and then click Generate Secret Key.
 
Give the key a meaningful name (for example, bk_orap2g), and then click Generate Secret Key
 
Copy and save the secret key because it won’t be shown again.
 
The S3 credentials are created by using an access key and the secret key. The access key is displayed in the Customer Secret Keys area of the Console.
Generate Secret Key: bk_orap2g
Generated Key: xxxxxxxxxxxxN5ujFRYICdG5RQbiuyxi07+PWrLdE=
Access key: cc3e970b898676154xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Create the directory and assign ownership

 

# mkdir /home/oracle/bkp_db
# chown oracle:oinstall /home/oracle/bkp_db
Mount the File System

 

$ s3fs bucket2fs /home/oracle/bkp_db -o passwd_file==${HOME}/.password-bk -o url=https://mynamespace.compat.objectstorage..oraclecloud.com/ -o nomultipart -o use_path_request_style
Add an entry in the /etc/fstab file.
#s3fs
bk_orap2g /home/oracle/bkp_db fuse.s3fs _netdev,allow_other,nomultipart,use_path_request_style,passwd_file=/home/oracle/.passwd-bk,url=https://mynamespace.bej2.objectstorage.eu-frankfurt-1.oraclecloud.com/ 0 0
If you get the following error, change the permission of /usr/bin/fusermount:
fuse: failed to exec fusermount: Permission denied
[oracle@ora2pg ~]$ ls -l /usr/bin/fusermount
-rwsr-x---. 1 root fuse 32584 Fev 25 2021 /usr/bin/fusermount
Run the following command, and then try again:
[oracle@ora2pg ~]# sudo chmod +x /usr/bin/fusermount

[oracle@ora2pg ~]$ ls -l /usr/bin/fusermount
-rwsr-x–x. 1 root fuse 32584 Fev 25 2021 /usr/bin/fusermount

If there’s an issue, add the Debug parameter to help troubleshoot:
[oracle@ora2pg ~]$ s3fs bucket-1 /test_bucket -o passwd_file=${HOME}/.passwd-s3fs -o dbglevel=info -f -o curldbg=
 
I hope this helps you!!!

 

Stay tuned, following on twitter @aontalba and on Linkedin

 

Andre Luiz Dutra Ontalba

 

Disclaimer: “The postings on this site are my own and don’t necessarily represent my actual employer positions, strategies or opinions. The information here was edited to be useful for general purposes. Specific data and identifications were removed to allow reach generic audience and be useful.”

 


New feature – Bring Your Own IP
Category: Cloud Author: Andre Luiz Dutra Ontalba (Board Member) Date: 4 years ago Comments: 0

New feature - Bring Your Own IP

Now Oracle Cloud Infrastructure allows you to Bring Your Own IP (BYOIP) address space to use with resources in Oracle Cloud Infrastructure. BYOIP lets you manage your IPv4 CIDR blocks to align with your existing deployment policies, security, management and achieve:

 

  • Solution continuity and hardcoded dependencies
  • IP pool management
  • IP reputation
 
The Oracle performs a validation process on imported CIDR blocks, and after validation you are notified that the CIDR block is available for advertisement.

 

Limits and Quotas

 

  • A CIDR block that is /24 or smaller is required for addresses to be advertised to the Internet.
  • You can’t bring more than 10 IPv4 address ranges to your OCI account.
  • You can create up to 10 pools.
  • BYOIP is not available to Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Free Tier or Pay As You Go services.
  • Your addresses can only be imported to a specific Oracle region.
  • You can use BYOIP with a CIDR block that is a minimum of /24 and a maximum of /8.
  • You can’t bring the same address range to more than one compartment at a time.
 

Requirements and Preparation

You must have ownership of the public IPv4 CIDR block you want to import into Oracle Cloud Infrastructure, and the ownership must be registered with a supported Regional Internet Registry (RIR). The Oracle validates ownership of your addresses. Only the following registries are supported, and the addresses must have a specified type or status:

 

 

The addresses in the IP address range must have a clear history. Oracle can investigate the reputation of the IP address range and may reject a range of IP addresses that contains an IP address associated with malicious behavior.

 

 

 

The steps required for BYOIP on Oracle Cloud Infrastructure require significant time, so plan ahead to perform such an import.
 
I hope this helps you!!!
Andre Luiz Dutra Ontalba

 

 

Disclaimer: “The postings on this site are my own and don’t necessarily represent may actual employer positions, strategies or opinions. The information here was edited  to be useful for general purpose, specific data and identifications was removed to allow reach generic audience and to be useful.”


Feature – Auto-tune Detached Block Volumes
Category: Cloud Author: Andre Luiz Dutra Ontalba (Board Member) Date: 4 years ago Comments: 0

Feature: Auto-tune Detached Block Volumes

Last month Oracle launched a great feature that helps with block volume costs.Let’s see a little bit about this feature.
 
You can now tune the performance of your detached volumes to the Lower Cost setting automatically. With this new capability, while your volumes stay in a detached state you can achieve significant cost savings.
 
When you’re ready to use them for your workloads, simply attach them, and their performance and cost are automatically and instantaneously adjusted to the performance setting you originally configured. 
 
When you enable this feature for your volumes, the volume is monitored and changed to the Lower Cost performance option automatically when it is disconnected and this setting is maintained until you reconnect it. This feature now comes integrated with the storage platform. You can take advantage of this with a click on the console or using a command line option in the CLI for each of your volumes.
 
Auto-tune for detached volumes capability is generally available for all existing and new boot and block volumes in all regions globally, on the Console, and through CLI, SDK, API, and Terraform.
 

 

Enabling and Managing Auto-tune for Detached Volumes

Enabling the auto-tune feature for detached volumes is straightforward with a click in the Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Console.
To enable auto-tune for a volume, on the Block Volume Details screen of the Console, click Edit and slide the Auto-Tune Performance setting to On for the volume. The Edit dialog window is also revised as part of this feature update.When you enable this feature for your volumes, the volume is monitored and changed to the Lower Cost performance option automatically when it is disconnected, and maintained in this setting until you reconnect it. This feature now comes integrated with the storage platform. You can take advantage of this with a click on the console or using a command line option in the CLI for each of your volumes.

 

When the Auto-Tune Performance is set to On for a detached volume, the auto-tuning takes effect after 24 hours. After that, if the volume is still detached, its performance and cost is lowered to the Lower Cost setting automatically.
After Auto-Tune is applied
After 24 hours
When the volume is attached again, its performance is set to the Default Performance setting immediately and automatically.

 

𝐇𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭𝐬

 

  • Build-in feature – New volumes or Existing ones
  • Applicable to Block & Boot Volumes
  • Available in all Regions.
  • Reduce Operational Expenses
  • Once enabled Auto-tune it takes 24 hours to be effective.
  • Done via Console, CLI, SDK, API, Terraform
  • Switched Automatically Lower cost Performance Option when detached from Instance.
  • When attached again it gets to previous defined settings.
  • Optional Feature – You have to enabled it while creating Volumes
 

 

I hope this helps you!!!
Andre Luiz Dutra Ontalba

 

 

 

Disclaimer: “The postings on this site are my own and don’t necessarily represent may actual employer positions, strategies or opinions. The information here was edited  to be useful for general purpose, specific data and identifications was removed to allow reach generic audience and to be useful.”


Oracle Autonomous Data Guard
Category: Cloud Author: Andre Luiz Dutra Ontalba (Board Member) Date: 4 years ago Comments: 0

Oracle Autonomous Data Guard

Oracle launched several services for customers last week. We already talked a little in this article about the Oracle Dedicated Region
 
Now let’s talk a little bit about Oracle Autonomous Data Guard.
 
When you enable Autonomous Data Guard, the system creates a standby database that continuously gets updated with the changes from the primary database.
With Autonomous Data Guard enabled Autonomous Database provides one identical standby database that allows the following, depending on the state of the primary database:
1. If your primary database goes down, Autonomous Data Guard converts the standby database to the primary database with minimal interruption. After failover completes, Autonomous Data Guard creates a new standby database for you.
2 . You can perform a switchover operation, where the primary database becomes the standby database, and the standby database becomes the primary database.
Autonomous Database does not provide access to the standby database. You perform all operations, such as scaling up the OCPU Count and enabling Auto Scaling on the primary database and Autonomous Data Guard then performs the same actions on the standby database. Likewise, you only perform actions such as stopping or restarting the database on the primary database.

Autonomous Data Guard Features

Autonomous Data Guard monitors the primary database and if the Autonomous Database instance goes down, then the standby instance assumes the role of the primary instance.
The standby database is created in the same region as the primary database. For better resilience, the standby database is provisioned as follows:
1. In regions with more than one availability domain, the standby database is provisioned automatically in a different availability domain than the primary database.
2. In regions with a single availability domain, the standby database is provisioned automatically on a different physical machine than the primary database.
All Autonomous Database features from the primary database are available when the standby instance becomes the primary after the system fails over or after you perform a switchover operation, including the following:
OML Notebooks: Notebooks and users created in the primary database are available in the standby.
APEX Data and Metadata: APEX information created in the primary database is copied to the standby.
ACLs: The Access Control List (ACL) of the primary database is duplicated for the standby.
Private Endpoint: The private endpoint from the primary database applies to the standby.
APIs or Scripts: Any APIs or scripts you use to manage the Autonomous Database continue to work without any changes after a failover operation or after you perform a switchover.
Client Application Connections: Client applications do not need to change their connection strings to connect to the database after a failover to the standby database or after you perform a switchover.
Wallet Based Connections: You can continue using your existing wallets to connect to the database after a failover to the standby database or after you perform a switchover.
Database Options: The OCPU Count, Storage, Display Name, Database Name, Auto Scaling, Tags, and Licensing options have the same values after a failover to the standby database or after you perform a switchover.
When Autonomous Data Guard is enabled the RTO and RPO numbers are as follows:
1.  Automatic Failover: the RTO is two (2) minutes and RPO is zero (0).
2. Manual Failover: the RTO is two (2) minutes and RPO is up to five (5) minutes.
 

Notes for enabling Autonomous Data Guard:

 
To enable Autonomous Data Guard the database version must be Oracle Database 19c or higher.
 
Autonomous Database generates the Enable Autonomous Data Guard work request. To view the request, under Resources click Work Requests.
 
While you enable Autonomous Data Guard, when the Peer State field shows Provisioning, the following actions are disabled for the database:
1. Move Resource
2. Stop
3. Restart
4. Restore
 
I hope this helps you!!!
Andre Luiz Dutra Ontalba

Disclaimer: “The postings on this site are my own and don’t necessarily represent may actual employer positions, strategies or opinions. The information here was edited  to be useful for general purpose, specific data and identifications was removed to allow reach generic audience and to be useful


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